P Flowers

“P Flowers” – 40 Flowers That Start With P (2022 Update)

P flowers: Nothing says spring like fresh flowers, and after a harsh winter, there’s nothing like seeing all the blossoms and colors spread all around you. If you’re looking for some color and life to brighten your landscape, there’s just one last thing: picking the best flowers.

With so many blooms available these days, it can be challenging to figure out what to buy! Thankfully, we’ve narrowed it down for you. So, no matter what type of flowers you are looking for, you can shop confidently for beautiful flowers that start with the letter P.

1. Pacific Anemone

Also known as Anemone multifida, Pacific Anemone is a charming perennial that forms loose clumps of silky slender stems clad with finely-divided showy leaves.

It’s a variable plant largely determined by ecological conditions with many distinctive races. It grows to heights from 10 to 70 centimeters, with each leaf divided into long pointed lobes.

Pacific Anemone is a fine wildflower for rock gardens and is very hardy in lowlands. The flower is easy to grow, as it has no serious pest or disease issues. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Summer (Early, Mid, Late), Spring (Late)
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Partial sun
  • Water: Medium

2. Pacific Aster

Popularly known as a late-season food for most types of pollinators, the Pacific Aster is a rhizomatous, perennial, herbaceous plant that grows between 40 to 120 centimeters tall.

The plant, which is native to the south coast of North America, has since become popular with gardeners across several countries.

Pacific Aster turns alive in July when it’s otherwise inconspicuous, knee-high, and its sprawling form bursts forth with clusters of purple daisy-like flowers. It’s useful for erosion control since it produces a large, extensive root system. Its prolific seed production capabilities make it easy to propagate. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Summer (Mid, Late), Fall
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Low

3. Pacific Bleeding Heart

Pacific Bleeding Heart

Dicentra Formosa (Pacific bleeding-heart) is a lush perennial herb that rises up to 1.5 feet from long, stout runners.

This plant grows easily in Western Washington gardens, looks good all summer, and combines well with shade lovers like primroses, hellebores, and ferns.

Pacific Bleeding Heart thrives in part shade, although too much shade may result in fewer flowers. Its flowery feature makes it a fantastic option for rock gardens, beds and borders, underplanting shrubs, and as ground covers. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Summer (Early, Mid), Spring (Mid, Late)
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Average

4. Pacific Pea

Pacific Pea

The Common Pacific Pea is a species of wild pea also known as Lathyrus vestitus. The plant, which is native to western North America, is a perennial pea vine that varies in appearance across subspecies.

The center features two whitish wings enclosing a white keel. Its leafy stems bear small, veined, green leaflets with alternate arrangements.

The plant’s seeds, leaves, and roots are edibles, and native Americans have used tinctures made from the roots as a general healing remedy and for treating internal injuries. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Summer
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Average

5. Pacific Reedgrass

Pacific Reedgrass

Also known as Calamagrostis Nutkaensis, Pacific Reedgrass belongs to the grass family. It is characterized by narrow grasslike foliage, smooth leaf margins, and leaf veins that are often parallel to each other.

The plant, which is native to western North America, is a perennial bunchgrass that forms thick tufts of stems that may grow above one meter. Pacific reed grass is a unique component of coastal habitats.

Growers typically use it to control soil erosion because of its persistent roots. The coarseness of its foliage makes it unpalatable for grazing. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season:  Summer
  • Maintenance: Average
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Medium

6. Padre’s Shooting Star

Padre's Shooting Star

Padre’s Shooting Star (Primula clevelandii) belongs to the primrose family and is native to California. The plant, which is known to live on hillsides, oak woodlands, and inland valleys, has beautiful flowers that serve to beautify a garden. The flowers typically bloom from magenta to deep lavender to white.

Each flower contains between 4 to 5 petals, and the top part of the flower hangs down from stalks bunched together at the top of the stem. The flower attracts insects like butterflies and bumblebees, who feed on its nectar and pollinate it. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Winter (Mid, Late), Spring
  • Maintenance: Medium
  • Sun: Partial sun
  • Water: Low

7. Paeoniiflorum Group

Paeoniiflorum Group

Papaver somniferum (Paeoniiflorum Group) belongs to the poppies plant genus. They have a profusion of crumpled petals that look like peonies, giving them the popular name, peony poppies. Paeoniiflorum Group is a hardy and upright annual plant with flowers that open up in a dazzling display of colors and shapes. They have several cultivars bred for their large, fully double vivid flowers in a stunning range of colors, including white, purple, pink, and deep maroon.

Cup-shaped flowers bloom for weeks in summer atop sturdy stems clad with glaucous foliage of grey-green shiny loved leaves. These showy flowers make for a bold planting scheme in beds and borders. They are perfect in cut flower arrangements, and the decorative seed pods have ornamental quality for dried arrangements.

  • Annual or Perennial: Annual
  • Growing Season: Summer (Early, Mid, Late)
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun:  Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Low, Average

8. Pagoda Horsemint

Pagoda Horsemint

Growing 1.3 to 2.6 feet, the Pagoda Horsemint is aptly named, with a tower-like structure resembling a Pagoda’s roof. Like some flowers in the mint family, this fast-growing herbaceous perennial forms clusters of flowers having two lips with bracts fringed by hairs. It blooms from late spring to late summer, with fragrant flowers in various colors from blue, purple, or white. The attractive features invite bees, butterflies, and other essential pollinators.

Flowers rise from sturdy stems clad with the evergreen foliage of lightly toothed dark green leaves. The leaves have a sweet mint fragrance used in teas, drinks, and sauces.

This wildflower typically grows in prairies, meadows, and savannahs. It is perfect for naturalized areas, cottage gardens, and native gardens. It is easy to grow and virtually pest and disease free except for powdery mildew.

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Spring (Late), Summer (Early, Mid, Late)
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Low

9. Painted Daisy

The profusion of colors from the chrysanthemum carinatum or Painted Daisy produces vibrant colors in a charming floral display for weeks. This compact annual plant shows off mid-summer in a kaleidoscope of daisy-like flowers. 

The blossoms feature a ray of flowers in a multicolored loop with two or more shades of pink, white, yellow, brown, purple, red, and orange. Each colorful flower ring surrounds a reddish brown to black central disk, creating a lavish contrasting display. Even when flowers are not in bloom, the foliage of chartreuse to dark green fern-like leaves have a feathery appearance that creates a flattering garden display. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Annual
  • Growing Season: Summer (Mid, Late), Fall
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun
  • Water: Average

10. Painted Doubles

Painted Doubles

Helleborus Winter Jewels (Painted Doubles) create an impressive art display in any garden. This plant blooms from late winter to early spring with large, double white flowers. 

Each flower blossom has a creative expression at the center with plum-purple and red highlights. 

The showy flowers appear atop sturdy, upright stems with evergreen foliage that starts as purple and ages into a fine-spun deep green. This stunning charmer will brighten the shade garden, containers, woodland gardens, and naturalized areas. Also suitable for ground cover and under large trees and shrubs.

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Spring (Early), Winter
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Partial sun, Full shade
  • Water: Average

11. Painted Lady

Painted Lady

Loved for its beautiful lush foliage, Philodendron ‘Painted Lady’ is a precious tropical plant that grows indoors and outdoors. This houseplant adorned with beautiful heart-shaped leaves grows 2-3 feet. The young leaves grow in an attractive, shiny neon color that ages gracefully into a glossy deep green. The yellowish variegation spots on dark green leaves look like a soft brush of paint, earning the Painted Lady its name and beautiful appearance.

 It has small flowers of cream, white, or green blooms in late spring and summer. Since the flowers have an awful aroma and only take up valuable plant nutrients, removing them works best. The multiple pink stems of this plant add structural depth and quality. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Spring (Late), Summer (Early Mid Late)
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Partial sun
  • Water: Low

12. Painted Trillium

Painted Trillium

Trillium undulatum (Painted Trillium) is an attractive clump-forming herbaceous perennial that produces exquisite flowers. The name Trillium suggests funnel-shaped flowers occurring in three parts. From mid-spring to early summer, single flowers appear on a single stalk with three white wavy petals embellished with dark purple to red highlights at the base in a splash of color. 

This plant also shows off with short arching stems clad with three large ovate blue-green leaves arranged like a whorl. Trillium is an excellent option for ground cover, looking breathtaking in shaded woodland gardens, wildflower gardens, and naturalized areas. Since it goes dormant in midsummer, it is best planted with other charming perennials to cover up the space created in its absence.

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Spring (Mid, Late), Summer (Early)
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Partial sun, Full sun
  • Water: Average

13. Pale Evening Primrose

Pale Evening Primrose

Who is the fairest of them all? That would be the Oenothera pallida or the Pale Evening Primrose. This perennial blooms mid to late spring, showing off lustrous silky white flowers. The flowers unfold in the evening with sweetly fragrant smooth and soft petals before closing up late morning. 

The Pale Evening Primrose displays reddish-purple buds that age gracefully into a soft pink. The flowers create a nice contrast against reddish stems clad with ovate leaves. 

It is attractive to bees, butterflies, and moths. It makes the perfect pick for beds, borders, wildflower gardens, rock gardens, and naturalized areas.

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Spring (Mid, Late)
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Low

14. Pale Purple Coneflower

Pale Purple Coneflower

The attention-grabbing Echinacea pallida or Pale Purple Coneflower is an attractive upright perennial that sits on top of the world in prairies, meadows, wildflowers, and cottage gardens. Blooming from late spring to midsummer, decorative tassel-like petals in stunning pale pink to purple colors hang from a prominent cone. This combination looks lovely above the evergreen foliage of long and slender dark green leaves. 

It is attractive to butterflies, hummingbirds, and other essential pollinators. The Pale Purple Coneflower creates a striking visual impact in beds and borders while making excellent cut flowers. In addition to low maintenance, cutting back stems will encourage new flower blooms.

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Spring (Late), Summer (Early, Mid)
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun
  • Water: Low, Average

15. Pale Yellow-Eyed Grass

 Pale Yellow-Eyed Grass

The structural depth and intricate design of the Sisyrinchium striatum (Pale Yellow-Eyed Grass) stand it out in any garden. This upright clump-forming perennial stands tall and graceful at 2-3 feet. In late spring or early summer, multiple spikes of cup-shaped flowers grow in clusters atop upright stems, with the blossoms opening up at sunrise and closing at sundown. It has creamy white to pale yellow flowers that mix and match perfectly with their golden centers and purple highlights in a beautiful union. The foliage of sword-shaped grey-green alternate leaves appears on erect stems. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Spring (Late), Summer (Early)
  • Maintenance: Average
  • Sun: Full sun
  • Water: Low, Average

16. Palm Sedge

Palm Sedge

Carex muskingumensis or Palm Sedge is the perfect ground cover with its feathery foliage of bright green leaves resembling miniature palm fronds. This ornamental grass spreads out from the top of rigid, erect stems as a dense, clump-forming sedge. 

Although primarily grown for its beautiful bright green foliage, noticeable spikes of flowers appear from the foliage in late spring and turn brown in summer. At the first sign of frost, the foliage turns a coppery yellow. The Palm Sedge grows 2-3 feet along ponds and streams and is perfect for water gardens, bog gardens, wetland gardens, and containers.

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Spring (Late), Summer (Early, Mid, Late), Fall
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Average, High

17. Palm Sedge

Palm Sedge

Carex muskingumensis or Palm Sedge is the perfect ground cover with its feathery foliage of bright green leaves resembling miniature palm fronds. This ornamental grass spreads out from the top of rigid, erect stems as a dense, clump-forming sedge. 

Although primarily grown for its beautiful bright green foliage, noticeable spikes of flowers appear from the foliage in late spring and turn brown in summer. At the first sign of frost, the foliage turns a coppery yellow. The Palm Sedge grows 2-3 feet along ponds and streams and is perfect for water gardens, bog gardens, wetland gardens, and containers.

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Spring (Late), Summer (Early, Mid, Late), Fall
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Average, High

18. Palm-leaf Mistflower

Palm-leaf Mistflower

The Palm-leaf Mistflower is a daisy-like wildflower that attracts butterflies with its fluffy blooms. This perennial grows 2 feet tall with a cluster of fuzzy lavender-blue flowers that are dainty and feathery. It is naive to North America, with flowers that start to bloom either from early spring or mid-summer depending on the location and last through frost. The blossoms appear above the dense foliage of green palmate leaves divided into three lines. 

Palm-leaf Mistflower attracts an abundance of butterflies. It is suitable for ground cover and perfect for a burst of color when other plants start to fade.

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Spring (Mid, Late), Summer (Early, Mid, Late), Fall
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Average

19. Pansy

Pansy

Spring and fall gardens can always rely on pansies for their bright and pretty colors and patterns all year round. This multifaceted heart-shaped flower has overlapping petals and beautiful markings at the center. They come in various colors: blue, pink, red, orange, white, purple, yellow, or a mixture. 

While pansies are dazzling on their own, they will create a breathtaking vision when planted with Violas and Primroses. Although pansies are short perennials, most gardeners grow them as annuals because they prefer cool weather. Sometimes, they can grow as biennials in areas with mild winters.

  • Annual or Perennial: Annual, Perennial
  • Growing Season: Spring (Early, Mid, Late), Summer (Early, Mid, Late), Fall, Winter (Early)
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Average

20. Papyrus

Cyperus papyrus is a tall impressive sedge from the grass family. This grass grows up to 13-26 feet along lakes, streams, and ponds and sometimes reaches heights of 29.5 feet along high-altitude lakes. However, the ornamental selection is 3-6 feet wide and can grow in containers.

The clump-forming stems are rigid and triangular, bearing a dense cluster of bright green rays of foliage that look like an umbrella. Greenish-brown flowers appear above the foliage in summer and eventually turn into brown nut-like fruit. Each umbel is accompanied by bracts that create a popping visual appeal. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Summer (Mid, Late)
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Average, High

21. Parrot Heliconia

Parrot Heliconia

Also known as Heliconia psittacorum or Parrot’s flower, Parrot Heliconia is a perennial herb native to South America and the Caribbean. Their large tropical leaves and exotic orange flowers make them a centerpiece in any garden. One of the unique features of this plant is its self-pollinating system. In other words, it doesn’t require pollinators for pollination since it has both male and female parts. The erect evergreen perennial forms dense tufts of lanceolate, causing its leaves to be bright and intensely green. The plant, which has no blooming season, produces inflorescence that consists of brightly colored waxy bracts all year long. It can also grow well as an indoor plant but needs a bright location to bloom optimally. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Seasons: Spring (Early, Mid, Late), Summer (Early, Mid, Late), Fall, Winter
  • Maintenance: Average
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Average

22. Parrot Lily

Parrot Lily

Parrot Lily or Alstroemeria psittacina is a perennial herb that produces underground tubers, but it’s for its ornamental benefits that it’s gained popularity among horticulturists. Parrot Lily is popular in parts of the United States and New Zealand,  where it usually blooms during Christmas. The plant is known for its exotic, feathery blooms that reminisce parrots; hence, its name. The plant, which blooms from mid-summer to early falls, is also known for its growing ease and the tropical touch and cheerful note it brings to any garden. 

Parrot Lily’s offset multiplication system allows it to form large colonies in any garden. However, it can also spread rapidly, causing it to become invasive in warmer climates, so it’s also important to be careful where you plant it. Its long vase life makes it an essential component of several bouquets, but it’s also so beautiful you won’t want to miss the chance to place it outdoors.

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Summer (Mid, Late), Fall
  • Maintenance: Low 
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Average

23. Parrot Pitcher Plant

Parrot Pitcher Plant

Parrot Pitcher Plant, also known as Sarracenia psittacina, is a carnivorous plant in the genus Sarracenia. The plant, which is native to the southeastern United States,  is noted for its propensity to produce abundant quantities of pitchers that retain their colors during normal winter dormancy periods. The carnivorous perennial is prized for how it adorns its purple and green pitchers with showy reddish-purple hoods that resemble parrot heads. It typically grows in moist, swampy soils and obtains its nutrients by consuming spiders and other insects. 

The parrot pitcher plants are usually 8 – 30 CM long and have a large wing on their upper side and a deeply curled hood. Although flower color is variable, some darker ones can sometimes appear almost black. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Seasons: Spring (Mid, Late), Summer (Early, Mid, Late)
  • Maintenance: High
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: High, Medium

24. Parrot Plant

Parrot Plant

Parrot Plant or Impatiens niamniamensis is a species of flowering plant in the  Balsaminaceae family, known for its erect, succulent, brown stem, resembling wood. The plant, which originates from Africa, provides a spark of bright colors in shady garden areas. Parrot plants are usually easy to care for, especially since the colorful, vigorous plant thrives with minimal attention. But beyond the caring ease, the plant is also loved for its clusters of bright, orange-red, and yellow, beak-like blooms. However, its tender nature makes it difficult to cope well with freezing temperatures. Impatiens niamniamensis is a recipient of the prestigious Award of Garden Merit of the Royal Horticultural Society. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Annual, Perennial
  • Growing Seasons: Spring, Summer (Early, Mid, Late), Fall
  • Maintenance:  Low
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Medium

25. Parrot’s Beak

Parrot’s beak, also known as Lotus berthelotii, is a herbaceous perennial in the bean family. The plant’s attractive spreading habit means more farmers are choosing to plant it in hanging baskets or on border fronts. A parrot’s beak is very sensitive compared to most trailing annuals and quite tricky to grow. This means that growers must be careful and follow certain conditions for effective growth. Parrot’s beaks thrive better in well-drained soils. The plant, which is native to the Canary and Cape Verde Island, hangs delicately like silver chains, contrasting sharply with the pea-like, bright crimson flowers. It has no serious insect or disease issues, but it’s still important to watch for root rot, especially if you’re planting in poorly drained soil. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennials
  • Growing Seasons: Spring (Early, Mid, Late), Summer (Early)
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Average

26. Parsley

Parsley

Also known as Petroselinum crispum, Parsley or Garden Parsley is a species of flowering plant in the Apiaceae family. The plant, native to the eastern and central Mediterranean region, has since been naturalized in Europe and is widely cultivated as herbs and vegetables. Generally known for its flavorful, dark green leaves, Parsley attracts insects, and you’ll likely see a few of them in your garden if you have this plant there. The plant’s unique blooming style stands it out. It blooms in the second year by sending up stalks with small yellow-green flowers in umbels. It has no pest and disease issues, but you must be careful with your pet because of its toxicity to dogs, cats, and horses. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Annual
  • Growing Seasons: spring (Mid, Late), Summer (Early, Mid, Late), Fall
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Medium

27. Partridge Berry

Partridge Berry

Partridge berry (Mitchella repens) is a famous plant in the genus Mitchella. The evergreen plant, which grows as a non-climbing vine, typically grows in dry and moist woods, on shady slopes, and around stream banks. It produces small trumpet-shaped auxiliary flowers in pairs, and its shiny, dark green leaves are ovate to cordate in shape. 

The Partridge berry is a member of the Madder family (Rubiaceae). It is also a fairly common inhabitant of coniferous and deciduous forests. The plant typically becomes more beautiful during the cold days of winter, with its dark green leaves and occasional scarlet berries becoming showier during this season. It has no serious pest and disease issues and is often considered easy to grow.

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Seasons: Spring (Early, Mid, Late), Summer (Early, Mid, Late), Fall, Winter
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Partial sun, Partial shade
  • Water: Average

28. Partridge Pea

Partridge Pea

Partridge pea, also called Chamaecrista fasciculata, is a species of Leguminosae native to the Eastern United States. It’s an annual plant that grows up to 0.5 meters tall. The bright yellow flowers that form from early summer till frost stand it out in any garden during these seasons. The flowers are hermaphrodites, meaning they have both male and female reproductive organs. However, it still needs bees to pollinate the flowers. Partridge peas are known for their bright summer colors that attract bees and butterflies. Its leaves collapse when touched, and that’s why it is also called a “sensitive plant” or “sleeping plant.”

Partridge pea provides attractive, blush-green foliage and bright yellow nectar-rich bloom in any garden. The plant is drought-tolerant and is often used as ground cover for areas susceptible to erosion. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Annual
  • Growing Seasons: Summer (Early, Mid, Late), Fall
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun
  • Water: Low

29. Party Dress Group

Party Dress Group

Helleborus × hybridus Party Dress Group are compact, neat, slow-growing perennials derived from double-flowered forms of H. torquatus. The plant is known to be upright, clump-forming, evergreen, or semi-evergreen, with its leaves becoming leathery, deeply lobed, and dark green in late winter and early spring. Just like real party dresses, this plant is exceptionally pretty and easily takes the shine in any garden. It typically features large, fully double, ruffled, and frilled pink blossoms resembling fancy dresses. The charming and very attractive beauties ride on sturdy thick stems above the glossy, green foliage. Its ease of growth and maintenance makes it a welcome addition to containers, shady borders, large shrubs, and woodland areas. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Seasons: Winter, Spring (Early)
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Partial sun, Partial shade
  • Water: Average

30. Pasque Flower

Pasque Flower

Genus Pulsatilla, also known as Pasque flower, windflower, prairie crocus, or Easter flower, is a species of an herbaceous perennial plant native to Asia, Europe, and North America. The award-winning plant is a lovely early blooming perennial known for its profusion of large, showy blossoms. Although low-growing, Pasque flowers are suitable for the front-end of perennial borders or rock gardens. It’s easy to grow and has no known disease or insect issues. The plant’s leaves are grayish-green and lacy, with silly hairs covering the leaves, stem, and buds to give it a fuzzy look. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Seasons: Spring (Early, Mid, Late)
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun 
  • Water: Average

31. Patchouli

Patchouli

Patchouli or Pogostemon cablin is a species of the  Lamiaceae family. The plant, which grows as a bushy perennial herb, is native to the island region of Southern Asia. Its erect stem typically grows to 75 centimeters, bearing small, pale pink-white flowers. The leaves are a great source of essential oil and can be used as a fragrance for perfumes and cosmetics. 

The large aromatic leaves are oval and irregularly toothed. The flowers’ dense wooly spike arrangements make the plant stand out in any garden. Patchouli is conducive for container growth and for planting in gardens. Its maintenance is also relatively easy, making it a staple in most gardens.

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Seasons: Fall (Mid, Late), Winter (Early)
  • Maintenance: Low 
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Average

32. Peace Pact 

Peace Pact 

Dahlia ‘Peace Pact’ is a dahlia cultivar native to Columbia, Mexico, Guatemala, and many other North American countries. It is usually found in highland areas and is not resistant to hot weather, although it prefers dry and cool climates. This pure white Waterlily type Dahlia is a very popular cut flower with long, strong stems. Their popularity is largely because of their long bloom time, good adaptability, colorful flowers, easy cultivation, and various varieties. It has an outstanding vase life (7-12 days) and remains upstanding, even during heavy downpours. Its physical structure makes it pop in sunny borders. But it also does well in flower arrangements, making them one of the most versatile plants in its family.

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Seasons: Summer (Mid, Late), Fall
  • Maintenance: Average
  • Sun: Full sun
  • Water: Average

33. Peach-Leaved Bellflower

Peach-Leaved Bellflower

The Peach-leaved bellflower, also known as Campanula persicifolia, is a flowering plant species in the Campanulaceae family. The herbaceous perennial grows to 1 m, and its cup-shaped flowers are either white or lilac-blue. The popular, fast-growing plant does well in containers and is also a fantastic addition to cottage gardens or lightly shaded woodlands. They are typically planted in groups, bringing an attention-grabbing splash of colors and height to perennial borders. Peach-leaved bellflowers can be the focal point of any flower arrangement when surrounded by shorter plants.  

Blooming over a long season, this plant features enchanting flowers that rise above, spreading mats of toothed, narrow, green leaves. It is exceptionally easy to grow and maintain and is relatively free from pests and diseases.

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Seasons: Summer (Early, Mid, Late)
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Average

34. Peaches and Cream

Peaches and Cream

The Grevillea ‘Peaches and Cream is a new and largely sought-after species of the grevillea cultivar, recently released in Australia. It is a medium-sized spreading shrub that grows up to 1.2 meters in height. Although very similar to ‘Robyn Gordon,’ the plant features a subtle bicolored flower head and outstanding garden performance, making it one of the most sought-after Grevilleas in recent times. It has a dense, spreading habit and attention-grabbing, bright green, deeply dissected foliage. The attractive flower’s long bloom time is one of the reasons why it’s so popular among gardeners. 

Birds and hummingbirds will enjoy their endless supply of copious nectars and beautiful colors. Its relatively small size makes it useful in small gardens. It is also tolerant to several conditions, including drought and humidity. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Seasons: Spring (Early, Mid, Late), Summer (Early, Mid, Late), Fall, Winter
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Low

35. Pearl of Heemstede

Pearl of Heemstede

Dahlia ‘Pearl of Heemstede’ is a clump-forming, bushy,  tuberous perennial with toothed, pinnate, dark green leaves. It grows in fertile, humus-rich, well-drained soil. It is an elegant Waterlily Dahlia with silvery-pink flowers that blooms between 15-20 CM wide. The plant, which blooms massively from July until frost, features beautiful colors that make it an excellent choice for showing or creating lovely garden displays. These outstanding qualities are part of the reasons it got the Award of Garden Merit of the Royal Horticultural Society. 

Pearl of Heemstede comes originally from Mexico but has since become a staple in many South and North American countries. It is not so difficult to grow as long as you maintain the right growing conditions. However, note that it is toxic to dogs, cats, and horses. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Seasons: Summer (Mid, Late), Fall
  • Maintenance: Average
  • Sun: Full sun
  • Water: Average

36. Pearly Everlasting

Pearly Everlasting

Commonly called Pearly Everlasting, Anaphalis margaritacea is an Asian and North American species of flowering perennial in the Asteraceae family. The plant grows erect up to 90 CM, with the underside of its leaves densely covered in tiny hairs. Pearly Everlasting is dioecious, which means that the seed-producing female and pollen-producing male are in different plants. This tall, herbaceous perennial wildflower is quickly becoming a staple in many American gardens because of its outstanding appearance and medicinal benefits. It’s also important to note that the plant’s dried stalk and pearly-white head make it attractive in floral arrangements. Pearly Everlasting is drought tolerant and is often planted as ground covers in areas that are erosion prone. Growing pearly Everlasting is relatively easy; you just have to control it by removing plants when necessary. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Seasons: Summer (Mid, Late), Fall
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Low

37. Penhill Watermelon

Penhill Watermelon

Dahlia ‘Penhill Watermelon’ is a stunning dinnerplate dahlia with magnificent, watermelon-pink blossoms. The plant, which is a member of the Penhill family has become a staple in many gardens because of its towering beauty. This plant’s large, lovely blooms are covered with shades of pink, lavender, apricot, and yellow, twisting petals that create a beautiful untidy look. Dahlia ‘Penhill Watermelon’ is native to Mexico and South America and reserves its display for mid-to-late summer and early fall. This plant’s incredible diversity of colors makes it one of the most beautiful dinner plates you’ll see. It bears flowers in abundance, easily attracting butterflies and other insects. Its enormous flowers will make it the talk of the neighborhood.

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Seasons: Summer (Mid, Late), Fall
  • Maintenance: Average
  • Sun: Full sun
  • Water: Average

38. Peony

Peony

The Peony is a flowering plant in the genus Paeonia, native to Asia, Europe, and North America. The herbaceous perennial is known for its possession of thick storage roots and thin roots for gathering water and other nutrients. The most notable feature of the Peony is its big, fluffy, fragrant flowers that come in a wide range of sizes, colors, and shapes. The resilient, long-lived perennial plant blooms in most locations in April, May, and June. The Peony is outrageously beautiful and offers a spectacular mix of flowers to your garden throughout its bloom time. 

Peonies make fine sentinels lining walkways or a lovely low hedge. They are drought tolerant, making them fantastic ground covers for erosion control. They are also easy to grow, although you’ll typically need to choose planting locations carefully because of the recent disturbances.

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Seasons: Spring (Late), Summer (Early, Mid)
  • Maintenance: Low 
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Average

39. Peppermint Geranium

Peppermint Geranium

Pelargonium tomentosum, commonly called Peppermint geranium, is a pelargonium species native to South Africa. The peppermint-scented geranium is a tall, spreading species that grows up to 1 meter in length and 1 meter wide. The aromatic, award-winning Peppermint Geranium works well in poor dry soils and exposed positions. However, it’ll be best to plant them near paths to fully enjoy the pleasant fragrance. Peppermint Geranium blooms from spring to summer, featuring tiny white flowers in dainty clusters above the fragrant foliage. The plants will also grow well indoors, although it performs best in fertile, well-drained soil under full sun. It’s a perfect addition to city gardens, beds and borders,  coastal gardens, Mediterranean gardens, containers, and cottage gardens. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Seasons: Spring (Late), Summer (Early, Mid, Late)
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Average

40. Peppermint Ice

Peppermint Ice

Helleborus ‘Peppermint Ice’ or Peppermint Ice is an eye candy for perennial lovers. The exceptionally beautiful double pink picotee hellebore can easily become the center of attraction in any garden. Its very large (3+ inches) lotus-like, cup-shaped flowers are easily noticeable because of their color and other physical features. The plant is extremely easy to grow and is a welcome addition to containers, shady borders, under trees, naturalized areas, and woodland gardens. They can serve as lovely ground covers and prevent erosion and other land disasters when planted in mass. They are also disease and pest free, although you’re advised to watch for slugs and aphids. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial 
  • Growing Seasons: Winter, Spring (Early)
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Partial sun
  • Water: Average

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