p flowers - flowers that start with p

“P Flowers” – 20 Flowers That Start With P (2022 Update)

P flowers: Nothing says spring like fresh flowers, and after a harsh winter, there’s nothing like seeing all the blossoms and colors spread all around you. If you’re looking for some color and life to brighten your landscape, there’s just one last thing: picking the best flowers.

With so many blooms available these days, it can be challenging to figure out what to buy! Thankfully, we’ve narrowed it down for you. So, no matter what type of flowers you are looking for, you can shop with confidence for beautiful flowers that start with the letter P.

1. Pacific Anemone

Pacific-Anemone-flowers-that-start-with-p

Also known as Anemone multifida, Pacific Anemone is a charming perennial that forms loose clumps of silky slender stems clad with finely-divided showy leaves.

It’s a variable plant largely determined by ecological conditions with many distinctive races. It grows to heights from 10 to 70 centimeters, with each leaf divided into long pointed lobes.

Pacific Anemone is a fine wildflower for rock gardens and is very hardy in lowlands. The flower is easy to grow, as it has no serious pest or disease issues. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Summer (Early, Mid, Late), Spring (Late)
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Partial sun
  • Water: Medium

2. Pacific Aster

Pacific Aster - P letter flowers

Popularly known as a late-season food for most types of pollinators, the Pacific Aster is a rhizomatous, perennial, herbaceous plant that grows between 40 to 120 centimeters tall.

The plant, which is native to the south coast of North America, has since become popular with gardeners across several countries.

Pacific Aster turns alive in July when it’s otherwise inconspicuous, knee-high, and its sprawling form bursts forth with clusters of purple daisy-like flowers. It’s useful for erosion control since it produces a large, extensive root system. Its prolific seed production capabilities make it easy to propagate. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Summer (Mid, Late), Fall
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Low

3. Pacific Bleeding Heart

pacific bleeding heart is a flower that starts with P

Dicentra Formosa (Pacific bleeding-heart) is a lush perennial herb that rises up to 1.5 feet from long, stout runners.

This plant grows easily in Western Washington gardens, looks good all summer, and combines well with shade lovers like primroses, hellebores, and ferns.

Pacific Bleeding Heart thrives in part shade, although too much shade may result in fewer flowers. Its flowery feature makes it a fantastic option for rock gardens, beds and borders, underplanting shrubs, and as ground covers. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Summer (Early, Mid), Spring (Mid, Late)
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Average

4. Pacific Pea

pacific pea or Lathyrus vestitus flower

The Common Pacific Pea is a species of wild pea also known as Lathyrus vestitus. The plant, which is native to western North America, is a perennial pea vine that varies in appearance across subspecies.

The center features two whitish wings enclosing a white keel. Its leafy stems bear small, veined, green leaflets with alternate arrangements.

The plant’s seeds, leaves, and roots are edibles, and native Americans have used tinctures made from the roots as a general healing remedy and for treating internal injuries. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Summer
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Average

5. Pacific Reedgrass

Also known as Calamagrostis Nutkaensis, Pacific Reedgrass belongs to the grass family. It is characterized by narrow grasslike foliage, smooth leaf margins, and leaf veins that are often parallel to each other.

The plant, which is native to western North America, is a perennial bunchgrass that forms thick tufts of stems that may grow above one meter. Pacific reed grass is a unique component of coastal habitats.

Growers typically use it to control soil erosion because of its persistent roots. The coarseness of its foliage makes it unpalatable for grazing. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season:  Summer
  • Maintenance: Average
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Medium

6. Padre’s Shooting Star

Padre’s Shooting Star (Primula clevelandii) belongs to the primrose family and is native to California. The plant, which is known to live on hillsides, oak woodlands, and inland valleys, has beautiful flowers that serve to beautify a garden. The flowers typically bloom from magenta to deep lavender to white. Each flower contains between 4 to 5 petals, and the top part of the flower hangs down from stalks bunched together at the top of the stem. The flower attracts insects like butterflies and bumblebees, who feed on its nectar and pollinate it. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Winter (Mid, Late), Spring
  • Maintenance: Medium
  • Sun: Partial sun
  • Water: Low

7. Paeoniiflorum Group

Papaver somniferum (Paeoniiflorum Group) belongs to the poppies plant genus. They have a profusion of crumpled petals that look like peonies, giving them the popular name, peony poppies. Paeoniiflorum Group is a hardy and upright annual plant with flowers that open up in a dazzling display of colors and shapes. They have several cultivars bred for their large, fully double vivid flowers in a stunning range of colors, including white, purple, pink, and deep maroon.

Cup-shaped flowers bloom for weeks in summer atop sturdy stems clad with glaucous foliage of grey-green shiny loved leaves. These showy flowers make for a bold planting scheme in beds and borders. They are perfect in cut flower arrangements, and the decorative seed pods have ornamental quality for dried arrangements.

  • Annual or Perennial: Annual
  • Growing Season: Summer (Early, Mid, Late)
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun:  Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Low, Average

8. Pagoda Horsemint

Growing 1.3 to 2.6 feet, the Pagoda Horsemint is aptly named, with a tower-like structure resembling a Pagoda’s roof. Like some flowers in the mint family, this fast-growing herbaceous perennial forms clusters of flowers having two lips with bracts fringed by hairs. It blooms from late spring to late summer, with fragrant flowers in various colors from blue, purple, or white. The attractive features invite bees, butterflies, and other essential pollinators.

Flowers rise from sturdy stems clad with the evergreen foliage of lightly toothed dark green leaves. The leaves have a sweet mint fragrance used in teas, drinks, and sauces.

This wildflower typically grows in prairies, meadows, and savannahs. It is perfect for naturalized areas, cottage gardens, and native gardens. It is easy to grow and virtually pest and disease free except for powdery mildew.

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Spring (Late), Summer (Early, Mid, Late)
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Low

9. Painted Daisy

The profusion of colors from the chrysanthemum carinatum or Painted Daisy produces vibrant colors in a charming floral display for weeks. This compact annual plant shows off mid-summer in a kaleidoscope of daisy-like flowers. 

The blossoms feature a ray of flowers in a multicolored loop with two or more shades of pink, white, yellow, brown, purple, red, and orange. Each colorful flower ring surrounds a reddish brown to black central disk, creating a lavish contrasting display. Even when flowers are not in bloom, the foliage of chartreuse to dark green fern-like leaves have a feathery appearance that creates a flattering garden display. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Annual
  • Growing Season: Summer (Mid, Late), Fall
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun
  • Water: Average

10. Painted Doubles

Helleborus Winter Jewels (Painted Doubles) create an impressive art display in any garden. This plant blooms from late winter to early spring with large, double white flowers. 

Each flower blossom has a creative expression at the center with plum-purple and red highlights. 

The showy flowers appear atop sturdy, upright stems with evergreen foliage that starts as purple and ages into a fine-spun deep green. This stunning charmer will brighten the shade garden, containers, woodland gardens, and naturalized areas. Also suitable for ground cover and under large trees and shrubs.

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Spring (Early), Winter
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Partial sun, Full shade
  • Water: Average

11. Painted Lady

Loved for its beautiful lush foliage, Philodendron ‘Painted Lady’ is a precious tropical plant that grows indoors and outdoors. This houseplant adorned with beautiful heart-shaped leaves grows 2-3 feet. The young leaves grow in an attractive, shiny neon color that ages gracefully into a glossy deep green. The yellowish variegation spots on dark green leaves look like a soft brush of paint, earning the Painted Lady its name and beautiful appearance.

 It has small flowers of cream, white, or green blooms in late spring and summer. Since the flowers have an awful aroma and only take up valuable plant nutrients, removing them works best. The multiple pink stems of this plant add structural depth and quality. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Spring (Late), Summer (Early Mid Late)
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Partial sun
  • Water: Low

12. Painted Trillium

Trillium undulatum (Painted Trillium) is an attractive clump-forming herbaceous perennial that produces exquisite flowers. The name Trillium suggests funnel-shaped flowers occurring in three parts. From mid-spring to early summer, single flowers appear on a single stalk with three white wavy petals embellished with dark purple to red highlights at the base in a splash of color. 

This plant also shows off with short arching stems clad with three large ovate blue-green leaves arranged like a whorl. Trillium is an excellent option for ground cover, looking breathtaking in shaded woodland gardens, wildflower gardens, and naturalized areas. Since it goes dormant in midsummer, it is best planted with other charming perennials to cover up the space created in its absence.

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Spring (Mid, Late), Summer (Early)
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Partial sun, Full sun
  • Water: Average

13. Pale Evening Primrose

Who is the fairest of them all? That would be the Oenothera pallida or the Pale Evening Primrose. This perennial blooms mid to late spring, showing off lustrous silky white flowers. The flowers unfold in the evening with sweetly fragrant smooth and soft petals before closing up late morning. 

The Pale Evening Primrose displays reddish-purple buds that age gracefully into a soft pink. The flowers create a nice contrast against reddish stems clad with ovate leaves. 

It is attractive to bees, butterflies, and moths. It makes the perfect pick for beds, borders, wildflower gardens, rock gardens, and naturalized areas.

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Spring (Mid, Late)
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Low

14. Pale Purple Coneflower

The attention-grabbing Echinacea pallida or Pale Purple Coneflower is an attractive upright perennial that sits on top of the world in prairies, meadows, wildflowers, and cottage gardens. Blooming from late spring to midsummer, decorative tassel-like petals in stunning pale pink to purple colors hang from a prominent cone. This combination looks lovely above the evergreen foliage of long and slender dark green leaves. 

It is attractive to butterflies, hummingbirds, and other essential pollinators. The Pale Purple Coneflower creates a striking visual impact in beds and borders while making excellent cut flowers. In addition to low maintenance, cutting back stems will encourage new flower blooms.

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Spring (Late), Summer (Early, Mid)
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun
  • Water: Low, Average

15. Pale Yellow-Eyed Grass

The structural depth and intricate design of the Sisyrinchium striatum (Pale Yellow-Eyed Grass) stand it out in any garden. This upright clump-forming perennial stands tall and graceful at 2-3 feet. In late spring or early summer, multiple spikes of cup-shaped flowers grow in clusters atop upright stems, with the blossoms opening up at sunrise and closing at sundown. It has creamy white to pale yellow flowers that mix and match perfectly with their golden centers and purple highlights in a beautiful union. The foliage of sword-shaped grey-green alternate leaves appears on erect stems. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Spring (Late), Summer (Early)
  • Maintenance: Average
  • Sun: Full sun
  • Water: Low, Average

16. Palm Sedge

Carex muskingumensis or Palm Sedge is the perfect ground cover with its feathery foliage of bright green leaves resembling miniature palm fronds. This ornamental grass spreads out from the top of rigid, erect stems as a dense, clump-forming sedge. 

Although primarily grown for its beautiful bright green foliage, noticeable spikes of flowers appear from the foliage in late spring and turn brown in summer. At the first sign of frost, the foliage turns a coppery yellow. The Palm Sedge grows 2-3 feet along ponds and streams and is perfect for water gardens, bog gardens, wetland gardens, and containers.

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Spring (Late), Summer (Early, Mid, Late), Fall
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Average, High

17. Palm Sedge

Carex muskingumensis or Palm Sedge is the perfect ground cover with its feathery foliage of bright green leaves resembling miniature palm fronds. This ornamental grass spreads out from the top of rigid, erect stems as a dense, clump-forming sedge. 

Although primarily grown for its beautiful bright green foliage, noticeable spikes of flowers appear from the foliage in late spring and turn brown in summer. At the first sign of frost, the foliage turns a coppery yellow. The Palm Sedge grows 2-3 feet along ponds and streams and is perfect for water gardens, bog gardens, wetland gardens, and containers.

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Spring (Late), Summer (Early, Mid, Late), Fall
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Average, High

18. Palm-leaf Mistflower

The Palm-leaf Mistflower is a daisy-like wildflower that attracts butterflies with its fluffy blooms. This perennial grows 2 feet tall with a cluster of fuzzy lavender-blue flowers that are dainty and feathery. It is naive to North America, with flowers that start to bloom either from early spring or mid-summer depending on the location and last through frost. The blossoms appear above the dense foliage of green palmate leaves divided into three lines. 

Palm-leaf Mistflower attracts an abundance of butterflies. It is suitable for ground cover and perfect for a burst of color when other plants start to fade.

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Spring (Mid, Late), Summer (Early, Mid, Late), Fall
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Average

19. Pansy

Spring and fall gardens can always rely on pansies for their bright and pretty colors and patterns all year round. This multifaceted heart-shaped flower has overlapping petals and beautiful markings at the center. They come in various colors: blue, pink, red, orange, white, purple, yellow, or a mixture. 

While pansies are dazzling on their own, they will create a breathtaking vision when planted with Violas and Primroses. Although pansies are short perennials, most gardeners grow them as annuals because they prefer cool weather. Sometimes, they can grow as biennials in areas with mild winters.

  • Annual or Perennial: Annual, Perennial
  • Growing Season: Spring (Early, Mid, Late), Summer (Early, Mid, Late), Fall, Winter (Early)
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Average

20. Papyrus

Cyperus papyrus is a tall impressive sedge from the grass family. This grass grows up to 13-26 feet along lakes, streams, and ponds and sometimes reaches heights of 29.5 feet along high-altitude lakes. However, the ornamental selection is 3-6 feet wide and can grow in containers.

The clump-forming stems are rigid and triangular, bearing a dense cluster of bright green rays of foliage that look like an umbrella. Greenish-brown flowers appear above the foliage in summer and eventually turn into brown nut-like fruit. Each umbel is accompanied by bracts that create a popping visual appeal. 

  • Annual or Perennial: Perennial
  • Growing Season: Summer (Mid, Late)
  • Maintenance: Low
  • Sun: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Water: Average, High

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